Acute Injury Management

Acute injury

is one of those unexpected events that we have probably all gone through. As it’s quite unpredictable for most, it leaves us extremely frustrated. How, why did this happen? When I speak about acute injury I am referring to sprained ligaments and torn muscles or tendons.

The number one question we ask as patients is (I have been a patient plenty of times), “how long before I’m back?” This can be tricky for practitioners. They want to give a realistic answer and tend to err on the side of caution. Continue reading “Acute Injury Management”

Tendinopathy

Tendinopathy

is described as an overuse tendon pathology. The Achilles, rotator cuff, patella and elbow extensor tendons being the most commonly affected. Much research into how to best manage tendon pathology is currently evolving. This research is based on the continuum model presented by Cook and Purdam. This model describes 3 stages of tendon pathology (tendinopathy). Reactive, disrepair and degeneration stage. (Cook et al, 2008). Continue reading “Tendinopathy”

Words & Pain Perception

Introduction

I was sitting at the kitchen table with a few friends the other day, chatting over a cup of tea. One of the lads was telling us about the goings on at his rugby club, when the topic led to injuries. He began to tell us that he helps out when the lads get knocks, giving massages and perscribing stretches. Now this guy works in an office with no experience in musculoskeletal injuries, so in a nice way we put that to him. His response sums up his knowledge and probably paints a picture of what many people out there may believe. Quote, “Sure I have a few slipped discs in my back which give me trouble now and then, but I can sort it by just popping them back in”.

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Hamstring Injury

Hamstring Injuries

The etiology of hamstring injury fall into two categories. The sprinting type injury and the stretching type injury. Hamstring injuries affect a wide variety of sports from track & field to soccer, rugby, GAA, gymnasts, and martial arts. Despite recent research into rehabilitation, recurrence and time to return to play, injury recurrence is high.

It is thought that the injury mechanism resulting from sprinting is caused by overload of the biceps femoris and semitendonis intramuscular tendon while decelerating, during the terminal swing phase of the gait cycle. Injuries affecting dancers and gymnasts, result in the proximal free tendon(semimembranous) being put in a position of extreme stretch. This can occur at fast or slow movements that involve simulatenous hip flexion and knee extension.

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