Tendinopathy

Tendinopathy

is described as an overuse tendon pathology. The Achilles, rotator cuff, patella and elbow extensor tendons being the most commonly affected. Much research into how to best manage tendon pathology is currently evolving. This research is based on the continuum model presented by Cook and Purdam. This model describes 3 stages of tendon pathology (tendinopathy). Reactive, disrepair and degeneration stage. (Cook et al, 2008). Continue reading “Tendinopathy”

Case Study – Calf Tear

Introduction & Anatomy

A calf tear is a common injury among the sporting population. The calf muscle that comes to mind at its mention, is the Gastrocnemius muscle. Gastrocnemius is the prime plantar flexor (standing on your tippy toes) of the foot. However it isn’t the only muscle that’s makes up the calf. The Sloeus, Plantaris and Tibialis Posterior muscles underlies it and all have a role in plantar flexion of the foot. Calf tears predominantly occur through ballistic activities such as sprinting and jumping. The musculotendinous junction is a prime place for tears to occur, however not the only one.

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Hamstring Injury

Hamstring Injuries

The etiology of hamstring injury fall into two categories. The sprinting type injury and the stretching type injury. Hamstring injuries affect a wide variety of sports from track & field to soccer, rugby, GAA, gymnasts, and martial arts. Despite recent research into rehabilitation, recurrence and time to return to play, injury recurrence is high.

It is thought that the injury mechanism resulting from sprinting is caused by overload of the biceps femoris and semitendonis intramuscular tendon while decelerating, during the terminal swing phase of the gait cycle. Injuries affecting dancers and gymnasts, result in the proximal free tendon(semimembranous) being put in a position of extreme stretch. This can occur at fast or slow movements that involve simulatenous hip flexion and knee extension.

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