My Toil With Achilles Tendinopathy

Achilles Tendinopathy

Anyone who runs knows a little bit about or has heard of Achilles tendinopathy. It is a frustrating over-load induced injury. Different factors contribute to tendinopathy. The site of irritation may be a clue, as insertional tendinopathy is commonly viewed as a compressive overload injury where midportion is viewed as a tensile overload injury. Although there is some evidence to suggest plantaris may have a compressive effect in mid portion Achilles tendinopathy (source). Traditionally both midportion and insertional were treated the same way. New research has highlighted the possible differences (source). With that come different loading strategies.

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Ankle Sprain – Physical Therapy

Ankle sprains are common place in both a sporting environment and during everyday life. The most common types of ankle sprains are an inversion ankle sprain and an eversion ankle sprain. With an inversion ankle sprain, the anterior talofibular ligament is disrupted and possibly the calcaenofibular ligament on the outside of the ankle. With an eversion ankle sprain the medial ligaments are damaged.

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Training Diary

What’s A Training Diary?

 

A training diary is an important element of a comprehensive training plan. We get so much information from our own personalised training diary. What we put into it is our own choice. With modern gps devices, a lot of informative data is recorded and displayed for you. This is nice as the readability and accuracy of it is clear and concise. You can add whatever fields you want to keep track of. Linking your watch to apps such as Strava, Training Peaks, Garmin Connect etc makes this information easily accessable on your phone, laptop or PC.

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Cycling Pain

Pain, Why Can’t I Hurt like a Cyclist

How is it some of us feel excruciating pain from something like stubbing a toe off a door, where others feel minimal pain from burns, cuts, fractures, abrasions etc?

 

(Johnny Hoogerland is seen to after his crash in the 2011 Tour de France – Tim de Waele/TDWSport.com)

I’m always astonished each year when the Tour de France (TDF) starts. You are guaranteed to have some big pile ups in the opening stages. Nerves are frayed as riders try to stay safe while also try to get good positions on each stage. Then the mountains come after the first week. The down hills are terrifying to watch with speeds in excess of 70kmph being reached. If the surface is wet you know someone is going to get hurt.

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Acute Injury Management

Acute injury

is one of those unexpected events that we have probably all gone through. As it’s quite unpredictable for most, it leaves us extremely frustrated. How, why did this happen? When I speak about acute injury I am referring to sprained ligaments and torn muscles or tendons.

The number one question we ask as patients is (I have been a patient plenty of times), “how long before I’m back?” This can be tricky for practitioners. They want to give a realistic answer and tend to err on the side of caution. Continue reading “Acute Injury Management”

Femoral Acetabular Impingement

Femoral acetabular impingement (FAI)

is described as impingment of the femoral head on the labrum of the acetabulum, resulting in destruction of the labrum and symptoms of groin pain and reduced hip range of movement. FAI can present as a pincer or cam lesion but more commonly both. It is closely associated with sports such as GAA, soccer, and AFL. Femoral acetabular impingement can be quite limiting, preventing the athlete from competing at the levels they desire to. Risk factors for femoral acetabular impingement include trauma and genetics. Its more commonly seen in young men but does affect women also. Continue reading “Femoral Acetabular Impingement”

Stretching, Should You Stretch?

Stretching

Static stretching (SS) has been used as part of a warm up protocol for many years. It is common to see teams of every code, athletes, cyclists, etc, stretching before their chosen discipline. It is also common among all levels of athletes to incorporate SS into their cool down regime. This methodical approach has been indoctrinated into us for many years by well meaning parents, coaches, teachers, etc.  However there is very little evidence to show the benefits of stretching. The supposed benefits of static stretching (SS) are to:

  • Prevent injury
  • Improve flexibility
  • Enhance performance.

Throughout this post I will look at each of these supposed benefits in light of what the evidence says. I will then give an alternate way to achieve these benefits were the evidence for SS is lacking. Continue reading “Stretching, Should You Stretch?”